Archive for June, 2017

The Way Back Machine – Best Sellers 1980

Take some time out of your busy day to hop into the Way Back Machine and travel with us to 1980. We can’t guarantee the weather will improve, but at least we can mock the crazy fashion choices to make us feel better (just don’t look in the closet when you return back to 2017…)

If you can remember that far back, you might recall

Of course, if you can remember that far back, you might also recollect the books that made it to the New York Times Best Sellers list for the week of June 22. If not, here they are…

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FICTION

1. The Bourne Identity by Robert Ludlum

2. Princess Daisy by Judith Krantz

3. Random Winds by Belva Plain

4. Kane & Abel by Jeffrey Archer

5. The Ninja by Eric Van Lustbader

6. No Love Lost by Helen Van Slyke

7. Innocent Blood by P.D. James

8. The Devil’s Alternative by Frederick Forsyth

9. The Bleeding Heart by Marilyn French

10. The Spike by Arnaud de Borchgrave and Robert Moss

11. Portraits by Cynthia Freeman

12. Back Bay by William Martin

13. Whip Hand by Dick Francis

14. Smiley’s People by John Le CarrĂ©

15. Hungry as the Sea by Wilbur Smith

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NONFICTION

1. Thy Neighbor’s Wife by Gay Talese

2. Free to Choose by Milton & Rose Friedman

3. Men in Love by Nancy Friday

4. The Third Wave by Alvin Toffler

5. Will by G. Gordon Liddy

6. Jim Fixx’s Second Book of Running by James F. Fixx

7. Donahue by Phil Donahue

8. The Real War by Richard Nixon

9. Anatomy of an Illness by Norman Cousins

10. The Brethren by Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong

11. Heartsounds by Martha Weinman Lear

12. War Within and Without by Anne Morrow Lindbergh

13. How You Can Become Financially Independent by Investing in Real Estate by Albert J. Lowry

14. The Book of Lists #2 by Irving Wallace, David Wallechinsky, Amy Wallace and Sylvia Wallace

15. Aunt Erma’s Cope Book by Erma Bombeck

 

Construction of Landmarks in Fiction

Boring subject heading, I know – but a fascinating topic!

Take Ten: That Girl is Poison…

When we talk about female killers – especially serial killers – we almost inevitably talk about poison. Historically, poison is the preferred weapon for women, possibly because they have been the ones to prepare meals, making adding a little something to food or beverages convenient and quiet. And even women who are killing off fictional people – led by Grand Dame Agatha Christie – have become experts in death by poison. The books below offer a look at the slow, eerie ends of those who come into contact with all sorts of interesting toxins – and the women who are responsible for them…

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A is for Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie – Kathryn Harkup

  • Investigates the poisons Christie employs in fourteen of her mysteries, discussing why the poisons kill, how they interact, obtainability of such poisons, and which cases may have inspired Christie’s stories.

The Case of Madeleine Smith – Rick Geary

  • In comic book format, an upper-class woman and a man of lower standing engage in a scandalous secret affair in nineteenth-century Scotland, but the relationship comes to an end when the man is murdered by poison.

City of Light, City of Poison: Murder, Magic, and the First Police Chief of Paris – Holly Tucker

  • Draws on transcripts, letters and diaries to chronicle how an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s led to Nicolas de La Reynie’s appointment as Paris’s first police chief, the installation of lanterns that turned Paris into the City of Light and the investigations in the criminal underground that implicated Louis XIV’s mistress.

The Devil’s Rooming House: The True Story of America’s Deadliest Female Serial Killer – M. William Phelps

  • Profiles the owner of a rooming house in Windsor, Connecticut, who was accused of murdering two husbands and sixty-six sickly “inmates” between 1911 and her arrest 1916.

Did She Kill Him?: A Torrid Story of Adultery, Arsenic, and Murder in Victorian England* – Kate Colquhuon

  • Tells the story of a young Southern belle, her older British husband, and the addiction, deception and adultery that keeps readers asking to the very last page, “Did she kill him?”

Female Serial Killers* – Don Rauf

  • A look at the psychology of women who kill.

Lady Bluebeard: The True Story of Love and Marriage, Death and Flypaper* – William C. Anderson

  • The story of the investigation behind the conviction of Lyda Southard, Twin Falls’s resident female serial killer.

The Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York – Deborah Blum

  • Chronicles the story of New York City’s first forensic scientists to describe Jazz Age poisoning cases, including a family’s inexplicable balding, Barnum and Bailey’s Blue Man, and the crumbling bones of factory workers.

Trials of Passion: Crimes Committed in the Name of Love and Madness – Lisa Appignanensi*

  • An examination of three cases, including one focusing on Christiana Edmunds, who poisoned her lover’s wife and many others.

Women Who Kill – Ann Jones

  • A study of women murderers in America from precolonial times to the present reveals a social history of the United States in terms of the women who murdered and their crimes.

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Annotations (except for starred items) are courtesy of NoveList Plus, which offers reading recommendations, reviews, and more.

Summer Reading 2017

After the wacky winter and cool spring we’ve had, it seems like all of us here at TFPL are ready for summer and Summer Reading. Last year’s program was successful, so we’re hoping we’ve created enough fun events and reading challenges to entice even more of you to participate this year. Our BUILD A BETTER WORLD program will begin on Monday, June 5 and finishes up on Saturday, July 29.

A full informational brochure is available inside the Library, with rules, events, and a chart of activities that will earn you tickets toward our prize drawings (or, you can download just the chart here). Prizes this year include tees, totes, travel tumblers, coloring kits, and more. All of this simply for reading, interacting with our electronic resources, and attending programs – which you were planning to do this summer anyway, right?

Call (733-2964 ext 200), email (tfpl@twinfallspubliclibrary.org), or drop by the Reference Desk to get more information.